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COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY FOR AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER (CBT-AR)

INTENSIVE TRAINING WORKSHOPS – 2018

By Jennifer J. Thomas, Ph.D & Kendra R. Becker, Ph.D

Hamilton New Zealand – 10 October (9am-5pm)
Chantwell Room, Hamilton Gardens

Gold Coast Australia – 12 October (9am-5pm)
The Glades Golf Club, Glades Drive, Robina Qld
Sponsored by Robina Private Hospital

Melbourne Australia – 16 October (8am-4pm)

Additional concurrent Breakfast Meeting: Introduction to ARFID (8:00am-9:30am)
Kensington Town Hall, 30–34 Bellair Street, Kensington, Parkville Victoria

Perth Australia – 19 October (9am-5pm)
Harry Perkins Institute, QEII Site, 6 Verdun Street, Nedlands

Sydney Australia – 22 October (8:30am-4:30pm)
Additional concurrent Breakfast Meeting: Introduction to ARFID (8:15am-10:15am)
Vibe Hotel Rushcutters Bay
Sydney workshop sponsored by The Redleaf Practice

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About

Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID)

Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) was recently added to the Feeding and Eating Disorders section of DSM-5 to describe children, adolescents, and adults who cannot meet their nutritional needs, typically because of sensory sensitivity, fear of aversive consequences, and/or apparent lack of interest in eating or food.

ARFID is so new that there is currently no evidence-based treatment for the disorder. We have recently developed and manualized a novel treatment—Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for ARFID (CBT-AR)—that we have been studying Massachusetts General Hospital in the United States (funded by the American Psychological Foundation and the Hilda and Preston Davis Foundation).

CBT-AR can be offered in an individual or family-supported format and comprises four stages:
(1) psychoeducation and early change;
(2) treatment planning;
(3) addressing maintaining mechanisms (including sensory sensitivity, fear of aversive consequences, and/or apparent lack of interest in eating or food); and
(4) relapse prevention over 20-30 sessions.

Our team has published in the New England Journal of Medicine a case report describing the successful treatment of an 11- year-old girl with CBT-AR, and we are actively recruiting CBT-AR trial participants from our ongoing National Institute of Mental Health- funded grant on children and young adults with ARFID entitled “Neurobiological and Behavioral Risk Mechanisms of Youth Avoidant/Restrictive Eating Trajectories” (R01MH108595). Early data from our efficacy study indicates that, on average, patients who receive CBT-AR add 17 novel foods, gain 12 lbs (if underweight), and significantly reduce food neophobia and food fussiness after treatment completion.

This workshop combines both didactic and interactive components, we will share therapy tapes, conduct role plays, and discuss cases from our forthcoming book Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: Children, Adolescents, and Adults (Cambridge University Press, 2018). 

Costs

AUSTRALIAN WORKSHOPS (include 10% gst)

General
ANZAED member
$A259
$A230
Breakfast meeting only: $A50
(Sydney & Melbourne)
Breakfast meeting only: $A25
(Sydney & Melbourne)

NEW ZEALAND WORKSHOP (gst free)

General
ANZAED member
 $NZ275
$NZ230

Schedule

Session 1 Introduction to ARFID: Assessment, Neurobiology, and Treatment
BREAK
Session 2 CBT-AR Stage 1-2
BREAK
Session 3 CBT-AR Stage 3
BREAK
Session 4 CBT-AR Stage 4, CBT-AR Efficacy, Questions & Answers

Presenters

Dr Jennifer Thomas is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the treatment of eating disorders. She is co-director of the Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where she evaluates and treats individuals of all ages with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, rumination disorder, and other feeding and eating disorders. In her academic role as Associate Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, her scientific research focuses on enhancing eating disorder diagnostic criteria to better reflect clinical reality. Jenny’s books Almost Anorexic: Is My or My Loved One’s Relationship with Food a Problem? and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: Children, Adolescents, and Adults, as well as her >100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, describe the many forms of disordered eating that are not fully captured by current psychiatric definitions. Jenny is also Director of Annual Meetings for the Academy for Eating Disorders, a member of the Eating Disorders Research Society, and an Associate Editor of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Dr Kendra Becker is a clinical psychologist and postdoctoral fellow at the Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)/Harvard Medical School with expertise and extensive training in cognitive-behavioral therapy and family-based treatment for feeding and eating disorders. She has lectured on avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), CBT-AR, the assessment and treatment of eating pathology, and neurobiology underlying eating disorders at the national and international level. She has published over 20 journal articles and 5 book chapters on mechanisms motivating and maintaining eating disorders. Her research has a particular focus on emotional functioning and personality traits in relation to eating behaviors and neurobiological substrates of restrictive eating disorders. She is currently also exploring the neurological and neuroendocrine features of ARFID compared to anorexia nervosa and the brain and hormonal changes that may result from successful treatment with CBT-AR.