2022 ANZAED Autumn Workshop Series
*Tentative Schedule

(All times listed below are in Local QLD Time zone – AEST)

8.00am – 8.30am Registration & Arrival Tea
Venue: Foyer Area

8.30am – 9.00am Opening Session
Venue: Harbour & Coral Room

9.00am – 9.45am Keynote Address
A Feminist Approach to Working Therapeutically with Eating Disorders by Jenny Gilmore
Chair: Megan Bray, Workshop Co-Chair
Venue: Harbour & Coral Room

9.45am – 10.45am Local project showcase
Venue: Harbour & Coral Room

10.45am – 11.05am Morning Tea Break
Venue: Foyer Area

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
Half Day Workshop: 11.05am – 1.45pm
The art of consultation in eating disorder treatment by Warren Ward

Chair:
Megan Bray, Workshop Co-Chair
Venue: Harbour Room

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
Half Day Workshop: 11.05am – 1.45pm
Behind Closed Doors: Effective Behaviour Change Strategies for Individual and Group Therapy by Carolyn Costin
Chair:
Rohie Marshall, Eating Disorders Queensland
Venue:
Coral Room

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Full Day Workshop: 11.05am – 1.45pm
Exploring the value of psychodynamic theory and practice within eating disorders treatment by Annaleise Robertson & Jeremy Freeman
Chair:
Aimee Maxwell, InMind 4 Health
Venue: Pacific Room

1.45pm – 2.30pm Lunch
Venue: Foyer Area

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Half Day Workshop: 2.30pm – 6.00pm
Gastrointestinal presentations in eating disorders by Elissa Robins
Chair:
Fiona Sutherland, The Mindful Dietitian
Venue:
Coral Room

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
Half Day Workshop: 2.30pm – 6.00pm
Peer Work in Practice by Shannon Calvert, Lisa Kelly, Laura Zuber & Rohie Marshall
Chair:
Laura Oakley, Eating Disorders Queensland
Venue:
Harbour Room

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Full Day Workshop: 2.30pm – 6.00pm
Exploring the value of psychodynamic theory and practice within eating disorders treatment by Annaleise Robertson & Jeremy Freeman
Chair:
Aimee Maxwell, InMind 4 Health
Venue: Pacific Room

(Morning workshop cont..)

3.45pm – 4.05pm Afternoon Tea Break
Venue: Foyer Area

6.00pm Friday Workshops Conclude

6.15pm onwards – Cocktail Reception at The Dock, Mooloolaba

8.45am – 9.30am Registration & Arrival Tea
Venue: Foyer Area

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
Half Day Workshop: 9.30am – 12.30pm
Beyond the dietetic consultation by Shane Jeffrey
Chair:
Megan Bray, Workshop Co-Chair
Venue:
Boardroom

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Full Day Workshop: 9.00am – 12.30pm
Informing the Treatment of Trauma in the Eating Disorders by Mandy Goldstein, Chris Thornton & Victoria Chappel
Chair:
Catherine Houlihan, Workshop Co-Chair
Venue:
Harbour Room

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Full Day Workshop: 9.30am – 12.30pm
Schema therapy for eating disorders – for complex presentations that do not respond to CBT by Evelyn Smith
Chair:
David Langford, Eating Disorders Queensland
Venue: Coral Room

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP IV
Half Day Workshop: 9.30am – 12.30pm
Workshop on attachment theory and its impact on eating disorders by Steve Arthey
Chair:
Aimee Maxwell, InMind 4 Health
Venue: Pacific Room

(Steve Arthey will be presenting this workshop virtually. Delegates can still register to be a part of the workshop in-person)

1030am – 10.50am Morning Tea Break
Venue: Foyer Area

12.30pm – 1.30pm Lunch
Venue: Foyer Area

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
Half Day Workshop: 1.30pm – 4.30pm
Research in the Real World by Phillipa Hay, Gabriella Heruc & Kate Mulgrew
Chair:
Belinda Chelius, Eating Disorders Queensland
Venue:
Pacific Room

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Full Day Workshop: 1.30pm – 4.30pm
Schema therapy for eating disorders – for complex presentations that do not respond to CBT by Evelyn Smith
Chair:
David Langford, Eating Disorders Queensland
Venue: Coral Room
(Morning workshop contd..)

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
Full Day Workshop: 1.30pm – 4.30pm
Trauma treatment in eating disorders by Chris Thornton, Mandy Goldstein & Victoria Chappel
Chair:
Catherine Houlihan, Workshop Co-Chair
Venue: Harbour Room
(Morning workshop contd..)

3.00pm – 3.20pm Afternoon Tea Break
Venue: Foyer Area

4.30pm Saturday Workshops Conclude

8.00am – 8.30am Registration & Arrival Tea

8.30am – 9.00am Opening Session

8.30am – 8.35am: Welcome by Siân McLean, ANZAED President
8.35am – 8.45am: Welcome to Country
8.45am – 8.50am: Welcome by Catherine Houlihan & Megan Bray, Conference Co-chairs
8.50am – 9.00am: Gabriella Heruc & Kim Hurst, ANZAED Credentialing Project

9.00am – 9.45am Keynote Address
A Feminist Approach to Working Therapeutically with Eating Disorders by Jenny Gilmore
Chair:
Megan Bray, Workshop Co-Chair

Overview: Traditionally eating disorders have been diagnosed and treated as medical conditions. However insights from feminist practitioners suggest the presence of other key factors in the development of an eating disorder. Feminist therapeutic approaches to eating disorders value the insights and knowledge that clients bring and explore the underlying issues that may give rise to an eating disorder. In addition, the social and cultural factors that contribute to diet culture and weight stigma contribute in subtle and pervasive ways. This session will explore these issues with an emphasis on the ways in which feminist understandings can inform therapeutic practice responses in work with clients with eating disorders.

Presenter:
Dr Jenny Gilmore is a Clinical Social Worker with an extensive work history in the field which includes academia as a Lecturer in the School of Social Work and Social Policy at the University of Queensland and work in the not for profit sector as a practitioner and manager. Jenny has been in full time private practice for over 20 years and has a specific focus on work with adults and young people who are survivors of childhood trauma.

Dr Gilmore established the first non-government, therapeutic service for clients with eating disorders in Queensland, Isis (now Eating Disorders Queensland), in 1996. She has presented at many conferences and published several articles on a feminist perspective of eating disorders including ‘Young Women and Eating Issues: A Feminist Perspective’, Youth Issues Forum, Summer, 14-16; ‘A Feminist Perspective on Eating Issues’, Paper presented at the Body Image, Sex Role Stereotyping and Disordered Eating Behaviours Conference, Queensland Health, October 1995; ‘Starving to Survive: A Feminist Perspective on Young Women and Eating Issues’, Paper presented at the United Nations 4th World Conference on Women, Beijing, August 1995; ‘Feminism and Eating Issues in Young Women’, Paper presented to the Working With Young Women in Juvenile Justice and Related Areas Conference, Department of Criminology, University of Melbourne, July 1995. Jenny has recently authored the ‘Clinical Guidelines for Therapeutic Interventions in Eating Disorders’ for Eating Disorders Queensland.

9.45am – 10.45am Local project showcase

EDQ’s Clinical Guidelines for Therapeutic Interventions in Eating Disorders: Eating Disorders Queensland (EDQ) has been at the forefront of therapeutic intervention for the treatment of eating disorders within a community setting, for over 25 years. We have pioneered therapeutic approaches to individual therapy, therapeutic group work, support programs for carers / key supports and loved ones, peer support and mentoring programs, psycho-educational group work, advocacy and social change. In all of these areas we have highlighted the value of incorporating the lived experience of people who have had eating disorders and have recovered. One of the defining features of the work of EDQ has been our focus on feminist and trauma informed approaches to understanding and working with eating disorders. The EDQ clinical guidelines presented here have been specifically developed to inform clinical therapeutic practice with clients who have eating disorders, rather than to manage just their medical and psychiatric care. It is important to note that we do not regard eating disorders as ‘disorders’ but rather as social issues that result from a range of complex factors in our society but that manifest within individuals as a response to these factors. The work of EDQ exists on the continuum of care and these guidelines sit alongside a range of medical and psychiatric interventions. These clinical guidelines have been generated from the ongoing experiences of practitioners at EDQ in addition to the growing research and literature base about eating disorders, feminist therapy and trauma informed practice. They are designed to share the range of approaches developed by EDQ over many years and it is our hope that colleagues, new and known to us, will take this opportunity to explore a diverse range of practice approaches to recovery for clients with eating disorders and those who care for them.

Wandi Nerida is Australia’s first residential treatment centre for Eating Disorders and is owned and operated by The Butterfly Foundation. The purpose built Residence is situated on the Sunshine Coast ,in Mooloolah Valley, on 25 acres of bushland. The facility took its first intake of participants in July 2021 , with the vision of making recovery a reality for those affected by eating disorders. The B-FREEDT model of care that is practised at Wandi Nerida is underpinned by Carolyn Costin’s treatment philosophy and is both intensive and holistic in its approach . The program continues to be reviewed and adapted by consumers and clinicians to ensure it delivers the best therapeutic outcomes in the Australian context. To date, Wandi Nerida has had 44 admissions from around the country , and is under an independent clinical and economic evaluation over the next 2-3 years . Despite the early operational period , there are already learnings, particularly for the development of centres and models in other states and territories that this presentation will explore. 

SCEDAT: Can you relate to feelings of frustration when seeing a client after their illness has become entrenched when earlier intervention would have helped? Perhaps you already know the frustration when client’s dropout part way through treatment or make appointments and don’t show up. What can we do about these challenges? Or perhaps your frustration has been knowing someone needs help but not being able to find anywhere for them in their local community. The Trial, also known as SCEDAT set out to answer these questions in the real-world setting of the Sunshine Coast. Funded by the Australian Government, the Butterfly Foundation and the Sunshine Coast PHN partnered with Flinders University and Partners in Practice to design a service intervention and a research project. The Trial relied on local health professionals and services like headspace, to deliver treatment. The goal was to wrap support around these local service providers to enable them to deliver integrated, evidence-based team care. During this presentation, on behalf of the other co-authors: Lesley Cook, Professor Tracey Wade, Catherine Johnson and Thu Dang we will explore: Modelling wrap around supports; The Research Findings; Lessons from SCEDAT; Care Navigation; What’s Next?

SCEDS: The Sunshine Coast Eating Disorder Service will present an overview of their Nourish Your Life program.  Nourish Your Life is an adjunct group program with the focus on providing supportive meal therapy whilst also offering the opportunity to explore cognitive remediation therapy, distress tolerance, sensory modulation, and expressive therapies. The program has been designed to work alongside and support someone having psychological therapy as well as those who aren’t. It is an open group program so anyone can attend and do not have to wait for a start date.

10.45am – 11.05am Morning Tea Break

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
11.05am – 1.45pm
 The art of consultation in eating disorder treatment by Warren Ward
Chair:
Megan Bray, Workshop Co-Chair

Aim of workshop:
This workshop will equip attendees with the knowledge and skills to provide effective consultation to clinicians, teams and services in the treatment of eating disorders.

About the workshop:
This half-day interactive workshop will provide attendees with a time-tested structure and approach to deliver effective consultation. The workshop will include experiential small group exercises in which attendees can practise consultation skills using mock cases provided by the presenter.

Topics covered will include:

  1. The purpose of consultation. Definitions. Consultation versus supervision and Liaison. 
  2. Know your ‘customer’. Individual versus team versus health service. Consulting to emergency depts, medical wards, general psychiatric wards, c-l psychiatry, gps, community clinicians. Public, ngo, private settings. Consulting to GPS.
  3. Preparing the consultation
  4. Delivering the consultation. Structure. Medical versus nutritional versus psychological. Multidisciplinary consultation. Approach. Process. Tips to engage customers.
  5. After the consultation. Written reports. Opportunities to build capacity: education, liaison, service development
  6. Challenges. The complex pt (ARFID, co-existing BPD, PTSD). The ‘difficult’ customer: consulting to clinicians/teams who are uninterested, dismissive, chaotic, I’m conflict, overwhelmed.
  7. Service development: Consulting to health services, managers, directors, governments.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Knowledge in how to prepare, structure and deliver effective consultations
  2. Skills in hosting consultations in a wide range of situations, including complex, challenging patients, clinicians, teams and environments
  3. How to ‘cut through’ and deliver effective useful applicable messages when consulting to generalist teams
  4. Knowledge in how to harness consultation opportunities to build capacity amongst both specialist and nonspecialist clinicians and treatment teams
  5. How to deliver an effective verbal and written report and recommendations following a consultation
  6. An introduction to consulting at a ‘higher level’ (organisations, managers, directors)

Presenter:
Warren Ward is Director of the Queensland Eating Disorders Service (QuEDS) and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Queensland. He is Chair of the Queensland Health Eating Disorder Advisory Group and co-author of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatry (RANZCP) Clinical Practice Guidelines for Eating Disorders. In 2017 he received the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders (ANZAED) Distinguished Achievement Award. In 2018 he was elected a Fellow of the International Academy of Eating Disorders. He has published more than forty articles and book chapters, most of them on eating disorders. He was recently appointed Medical Director of Wandi Nerida, Australia’s first residential program for eating disorders.

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
11.05am – 1.45pm Behind Closed Doors: Effective Behaviour Change Strategies for Individual and Group Therapy by Carolyn Costin
Chair:
Rohie Marshall, Eating Disorders Queensland

Workshop Overview: Carolyn Costin brings to this workshop four decades of experience as an individual and group therapist working in outpatient, day treatment, hospital and residential settings. Her 6 books and her success in opening the first residential treatment center for eating disorders in the US lead Carolyn to teach successful treatment strategies in conferences and trainings all over the world.

Though recognizing the importance of evidenced based treatments such as CBT or FBT, we know they only work a percentage of the time. Carolyn teaches practitioners other tools necessary for their treatment tool box.

This workshop will be interactive as well as educational, with the time being divided into 4 equal parts.

Part 1. Contacting and Transforming the Eating Disorder Self: Each client has a core healthy self but over time, due to a combination of risk factors, has developed an eating disorder self that dictates thoughts and behaviors. This part of the workshop will discuss how to access both the healthy self and the eating disorder self and how to help clients strengthen their healthy self and put the eating disorder self out of a job.

Part 2. Dealing with Resistance: Resistance and ambivalence come with the territory of eating disorder treatment. Clients often withhold information or lie to their treatment team. They often feel like and even say that, they don’t want to get better, they are afraid to get better, they don’t think they can get better, it is not worth getting better, they don’t know how to get better, etc. In this section of the workshop Carolyn discusses common areas of resistance, detailing strategies for moving clients past resistance into behavior change.

Part 3. The Therapeutic Relationship: Several research studies show that a positive therapeutic relationship is a robust predictor of successful therapy, yet what does this mean? What is a positive therapeutic relationship, what are the specific factors that create such a relationship and how does one achieve this? Carolyn will explain how clinicians can make immediate use of the research from authors such as Miller and Norcross, “Therapeutic Relationship in Treatment Outcome, ” Wampold and Imel, “The Great Psychotherapy Debate, ” Dan Siegel, “The Mindful Therapist, ” and Porges, Geller and Greenberg and their use of “Polyvagal Theory.” Clinicians will gain a deeper understanding of how, who they are, not just the treatment modality they use, is an important tool in their toolbox.

Part 4. What To Do When…: The last section is a particularly lively and interactive part of the workshop where Carolyn invites participants to ask questions about difficult situations or cases. With over four decades of clinical work behind her, Carolyn answers any question such as, “What do you do when a patient refuses to gain weight and/or continually loses any weight achieved?” “How do you help a patient who seems motivated but cannot follow through with behavior goals?” “How do you run a group with a mix of patients with varying eating disorder diagnosis?” “ What are some topics to use in group therapy or family therapy?” This aspect of Carolyn’s presentations have been highly valued and appreciated, always ending with participants asking for more.

Presenter:
Carolyn Costin is a world renowned, highly sought-after eating disorder clinician, author, and international speaker. Recovered from anorexia in her twenties, as a young therapist Carolyn recognized her calling after successfully treating her first eating disorder client. Carolyn was first to publicly take the position that people with eating disorders can become fully recovered. She is a pioneer in the field, promoting the value of appropriately training and utilizing recovered individuals as an adjunct to overall support and care. After 15 years in private practice and running hospital programs, Carolyn was determined to improve the eating disorder relapse rate and recognized a gap in the eating disorder field. She opened Monte Nido, the first residential facility, located in a home setting, surrounded by nature, where standard treatment was combined with meditation and yoga. For the first time clients with eating disorders were provided a setting where they could make the necessary behavior changes to ensure full recovery upon discharge, e.g., the ability to shop for, prepare and cook food. 

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
11.05am – 1.45pm Exploring the value of psychodynamic theory and practice within eating disorders treatment by Annaleise Robertson & Jeremy Freeman
Chair:
Aimee Maxwell, InMind 4 Health

Abstract: While psychodynamic psychotherapy has developed as an evidence-based treatment for eating disorders in it its own right, psychodynamic theory, thinking and practice is also applicable across models to enhance the efficacy and experience of therapy for the person  experiencing the eating disorder, their family/supports, the therapist and the treatment team. It encourages us to delve into the universal human experience of facing challenges in life, how we cope, and the healing power of relationships and self-reflection.

This one day workshop will balance an exploration of psychodynamic theory, clinical material and unique experiential learning designed to enhance reflective practice and develop clinical skills. We will include a brief summary of the development of some fundamental psychoanalytic concepts covering Freud, Klein and Bion up to modern psychodynamic ideas and applications. We will draw from key clinical papers, video and audio clips, and tasks essential to the learning and practice of psychodynamic psychotherapy, including infant observation and group case discussion. There will be time for you to think about how these ideas can be incorporated into your individual and workplace practice, regardless of your setting, the population you work with or your level of experience.

Presenters:
Dr Annaleise Robertson is a clinical psychologist and supervisor who specialises in systemic and psychodynamic frameworks for working with young people experiencing eating disorders, their families, and the therapists that support them. Annaleise has worked in a full-time clinical role at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead since 2012, with extensive experience in both inpatient, outpatient and group therapy. She has recently returned from two years living in London where she worked at the Maudsley Centre for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders and undertook further psychodynamic training at the Tavistock and Portman Institute. Annaleise provides regular education, training and supervision in eating disorders, including consultation with ANZAED as a group supervisor, the National Eating Disorder Collaboration (NEDC) and the University of Sydney.

Jeremy Freeman is a clinical psychologist who has worked in public child, adolescent and family centres, and in private practice, managing a range of conditions including eating disorders. He has done training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy and in psychoanalysis. He has a special interest in adapting psychodynamic ideas and practices to forms of practice that are not considered to be psychodynamic.

1.45pm – 2.30pm Lunch

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
2.30pm – 6.00pm Gastrointestinal presentations in eating disorders by Elissa Robins
Chair:
Fiona Sutherland, The Mindful Dietitian

(3.45pm – 4.05pm Afternoon Tea Break)

Aim of workshop: This workshop will equip attendees with knowledge and skills to i) understand the connection between functional gastrointestinal disorders and eating disorders ii) recognize the most common gastrointestinal conditions that clients with ED will present iii) begin to apply dietary interventions and non-dietary tools to improve symptoms of gastrointestinal issues and iv) be able to manage risk and reduce harm through the application of evidence-based elimination diets

About the workshop: This half-day interactive workshop will provide attendees with experiential learning opportunities such as case studies, and opportunities to analyse completed symptom charts and decode sample food symptom charts.

Attendees will learn:

  1. Evidence based dietary interventions for gastrointestinal issues, including regularity, fibre modification and supplementation, irritant modification, FODMAP, FODMAP light, and food sensitivity/allergy modification.
  2. How to monitor and evaluate dietary interventions through symptom charts, food, symptom & stool diaries.
  3. Non-dietary tools for GI issues such as supplementation, non-invasive physical supports, pelvic floor physio, gut-focused psychology/hypnotherapy and mindfulness based therapies including diaphragmatic breathing.

Presenter:
Elissa Robins has 18 years of experience as a dietitian and is a Monash University Adjunct Research Fellow. She worked for 14 years in the hospital inpatient and outpatient settings across surgical, gastroenterology and critical care services. In 2017 she established her private practice Inner Health Nutrition, which focuses on digestive concerns and HAES.  Over the past 4 years, Elissa has developed a special interest in and understanding of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGID’s) and has expanded to seeing more clients living with both FGID’s and Eating Disorders. 

E: elissa@innerhealthnutrition.com.au| W:www.innerhealthnutrition.com.au

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
2.30pm – 6.00pm
Peer Work in Practice by Shannon Calvert, Lisa Kelly, Laura Zuber & Rohie Marshall
Chair:
Laura Oakley, Eating Disorders Queensland

(3.45pm – 4.05pm Afternoon Tea Break)

Workshop Overview: Eating Disorders Qld (EDQ) is dedicated to incorporating lived experience into all aspects of service development and delivery and has a long-standing history of providing training and support to lived experience mentors and speakers. Providing a nurturing and empowering environment for those with lived experience is a key part of the community recovery model, and by supporting and strengthening lived experience leadership EDQ is able to build a strong and self-sustaining community.

In recent years, EDQ has expanded the opportunities for lived experience and created an established pathway leading to paid and recognised lived experience positions within the organisation. This pathway includes training, supervision, structured programs, and collaborative work alongside a client and their treating team. The steps of the pathway include peer mentoring through EDQ’s PMP program (volunteer role), story telling and speaking opportunities (paid), co-facilitation of Peer Support Group (paid), and finally working in an Intentional Peer Support Worker (IPSW) role (paid permanent position). The IPSW role incorporates skills learnt in the previous roles, from providing peer guidance, sharing a recovery journey in a safe way, and facilitating individual or group sessions.

This workshop will outline the pathway that EDQ has developed that leads from the first contributions of sharing lived experience in the community, through to intentional paid peer support work. We will discuss key learnings from our experiences integrating intentional peer support roles, and key points to consider when incorporating a similar model into your own practice.

Participants will be invited to consider how their practice could support the integration, and professional development, of either volunteer or paid lived experience workers in roles such as mentor, speaker, or Intentional Peer Support Worker.

Presenters:
Shannon Calvert is a lived experience professional, having experienced a longstanding eating disorder. Her expertise lies in collaborating alongside clinicians, researchers, and organisations that champion wellbeing through education, training, and supervision. Advocating for person-centred, recovery-oriented and integrated best practice, she is a Consumer and Peer Consultant for a large Health Service in WA, and a Lived Experience Educator. Shannon has presented at national and international conferences on the importance of compassion in treatment interventions; consumer and carer engagement in design of policy, and education; as well as her lived experience of an eating disorder and trauma.

Lisa Kelly, Eating Disorders Practitioner, has a lived experience of eating issues and trauma, and holds knowledge and understanding around the difficulties associated with the journey towards recovery. Since having overcome these experiences she has volunteered as a mentor, recovery group facilitator and speaker within the Eating Disorders Qld space for many years. One of EDQ’s most important values is that recovery is possible and Lisa is committed to empowering those in recovery by providing non-judgemental, compassionate support to break the shame and stigmas associated with having an eating disorder. Lisa values all individuals as experts of their own experience and seeks to reduce the isolation that is a key issue in the eating issues community. A life that isn’t dictated by an eating disorder is possible and Lisa is passionate about supporting individuals on their journey to recovery. A visual artist and musician in her own time, Lisa has an undergraduate degree in Psychology and a Masters in Social Work.

Laura Zuber‘s (Peer Worker) framework is collaborative and person-centred. She found freedom using her love of helping others, education and humorous honesty. Laura provides a positive, entertaining voice alongside support and education to anyone with eating disorders, body-confidence struggles and anxiety through harnessing the power of sharing, intuition and non-judgmental acceptance of one another. She speaks, mentors and supports both publicly and privately about her lived experiences of eating disorders alongside Eating Disorders Queensland, The Butterfly Foundation and The Wandi Nerida Facility. She further hopes to be a part of reducing shame, isolation and stigma that surrounds eating issues and mental health and help individuals create a positive, compassionate relationship with their body, mind and whole self.

Rohie Marshall is Care Navigator and Public Health Lead at Eating Disorders Qld. This dual role draws on her strong understanding of the complexities of the healthcare system, and ability to translate these complexities into accessible programs, services, and messages for a variety of needs. Rohie advocates for the importance of co-design processes and community engagement as an organisational priority.  She also values the diversity of EDQ’s clients and practitioners and works to ensure that all are welcome and supported by our service options.

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
2.30pm – 6.00pm
Exploring the value of psychodynamic theory and practice within eating disorders treatment by Annaleise Robertson & Jeremy
Freeman
Chair:
Aimee Maxwell, InMind 4 Health
(Morning workshop cont..)
(3.45pm – 4.05pm Afternoon Tea Break)

6.00pm Friday Workshops Conclude

6.15pm onwards – Cocktail Reception at The Dock, Mooloolaba
The cocktail function will be held immediately following the day’s program. The venue is only a short walk from the Mantra Mooloolaba Beach.

Tickets for the cocktail function can be purchased during the registration process. Delegates can also purchase tickets for their partners/guests.
Ticket cost includes canapes and 2 drink tickets. Delegates are able to purchase more drinks from a cash bar.
AWS Delegate Ticket Cost:
A$20; Partner/Guest Ticket Cost: A$65

Dress Code: Smart Casuals

9.00am – 9.30am Registration & Arrival Tea

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
9.30am – 12.30pm
Beyond the dietetic consultation by Shane Jeffrey
Chair:
Megan Bray, Workshop Co-Chair

(1030am – 10.50am Morning Tea Break)

Workshop Overview: The provision of safe and effective dietetic consultation is thought to extend beyond the consultation itself, with the consultation being supported by various ‘wrap around’ services to optimise the treatment experience for both the dietitian and the client. Such ‘warp around’ services include, but are not limited to:

  • Self care
  • Client safety and contracts
  • Caseload and session management
  • Communication with the client, their support network, and the treating team
  • Managing clients who are struggling to progress or actively engage in recovery

This workshop will explore these multidimensional aspects of dietetic care through group discussion, case examples and clinical experience. Attendees will also be provided with an opportunity to reflect on their own practices and reflect on how these ‘wrap around’ services could potentially be developed and applied in their own clinical settings.

Presenter:

Shane Jeffrey is an Accredited Practicing Dietitian and Accredited Sports Dietitian with 25 years of experience as a dietitian in both the private and public sectors, working almost exclusively in the field of eating disorders and the non-diet approach.  With an interest in workforce development, Shane presents on eating disorder related topics into various universities and provides mentoring and professional supervision to dietitians practicing in the area. Shane is the founder and clinical director at River Oak Health and Food Mind Body, Queensland based private practices dedicated to the treatment of eating, weight and body image concerns, and he is the current treasurer of the Australian & New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders.

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)
9.30am – 12.30pm
Schema therapy for eating disorders – for complex presentations that do not respond to CBT by Evelyn Smith
Chair:
David Langford, Eating Disorders Queensland

(1030am – 10.50am Morning Tea Break)

Workshop Overview: Options can be limited for those who do not respond to standard eating disorder treatments. Schema therapy is one of the exciting new frontiers in the treatment of this clinical population, offering a much-needed model that integrates both developmental and deeper level personality factors. This full-day introductory workshop will provide attendees with an overview of the state of the evidence for schema therapy in eating disorders and experiential learning opportunities. Pre-reading materials will be made available.

Attendees will learn:

  1. When to use schema in eating disorders
  2. The state of the evidence for schema therapy in eating disorders
  3. Chair work
  4. Imagery

Presenter:
Dr Evelyn Smith has been a practising clinical psychologist for over a decade, and has been passionate about providing evidence-based treatment to individuals with eating disorders. She is currently a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the School of Psychology, Western Sydney University, where she enjoys providing training and supervision to the next generation of clinical psychologists. She was the Head of the Eating disorders and Obesity research clinic (EDOC), and has been the chief investigator of multiple large grants investing new treatments for eating disorders, including a WSU Women’s Research Fellowship to investigate the efficacy of group schema therapy for eating disorders. She co-edited the book Schema therapy for eating disorders with Dr Susan Simpson (published by Routledge), and is an Associate Editor of the journal Clinical Obesity.

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
BOOKED OUT (This workshop has reached maximum capacity)

9.00am – 12.30pm Informing the Treatment of Trauma in the Eating Disorders by Mandy Goldstein, Chris Thornton & Victoria Chappel
Chair:
Catherine Houlihan, Workshop Co-Chair

(1030am – 10.50am Morning Tea Break)

Workshop Overview: There has been much talk in the eating disorders sector on ‘Trauma Informed Treatment’. Much less has been said about ‘Informed Trauma Treatment’ when trauma and eating disorders co-occur. This workshop is intended for mental health practitioners with a good understanding of the evidence-based treatment of eating disorders who are wanting to improve their knowledge of what treatments may help their more complex patients.

Research has established a clear link between trauma and eating disorders (EDs), with childhood sexual assault emerging as a risk factor for psychiatric illness generally and as a non-specific risk factor for eating disorders (Brewerton, 2007). Patients with a trauma history are likely to have more severe ED symptoms (Hall et al., 2018) and higher levels of comorbidity (Brewerton, 2007).

Where they do co-occur, the clinical picture can be complex, with each disorder impacting or serving to maintain the other. Eating disorders can be seen as both a solution to the problem of trauma, as well as a problem itself. There is little current guidance informing integrated treatment approaches (Mitchel et al., 2021; Trottier & Monson., 2021).

This workshop aims to help mental health clinicians develop a greater understanding of the impact of trauma on the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Based on the clinician’s existing understanding of the clinical practice standards for the treatment of eating disorders (Hurst et al., 2020) and utilising concepts of therapeutic relationship, non-negotiables, working in a multi-disciplinary team and particularly case formulation, this workshop will aim to outline the decisions relating to the ‘sequence of treatment’ that clinicians face when dealing with complexity.

Ideas from the evidence-based treatment of trauma will be presented. Both cognitive and somatic approaches to trauma will be discussed with examples of how to weave these trauma treatments into eating disorders treatment. It is hoped that clinicians will be motivated to delve deeper into more detailed learning of specific trauma treatments.

The workshop invites clinicians to bring their own clinical material for discussion.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the rates of co-occurrence between trauma and eating disorders.
  2. Understand how the presence of trauma affects the formulation and treatment of a person presenting with an eating disorder.
  3. Distinguish between the treatment necessary for a patient with an eating disorder and PTSD and someone presenting with complex trauma.
  4. Have increased awareness of evidence-based treatment of trauma with a view to further developing their own skills through further training.
  5. Develop a greater understanding of the sequence of eating disorder and trauma treatments.

Arditte Hall, K. A., Bartlett, B. A., Iverson, K. M., & Mitchell, K. S. (2018). Eating disorder symptoms in female veterans: The role of childhood, adult, and military trauma exposure. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 10(3), 345.
Brewerton, T. D. (2007). Eating disorders, trauma, and comorbidity: Focus on PTSD. Eating disorders, 15(4), 285-304.
Hurst, K., Heruc, G., Thornton, C., Freeman, J., Fursland, A., Knight, R., Roberts, M., Shelton, B., Wallis, A., & Wade, T. (2020). ANZAED practice and training standards for mental health professionals providing eating disorder treatment. Journal of Eating Disorders, 8(1), 1-10.
Mitchell, K. S., Scioli, E. R., Galovski, T., Belfer, P. L., & Cooper, Z. (2021). Posttraumatic stress disorder and eating disorders: maintaining mechanisms and treatment targets. Eating disorders, 1-15.
Trottier, K., & Monson, C. M. (2021). Integrating cognitive processing therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder with cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders in PROJECT RECOVER. Eating disorders, 1-19.

Presenters:
Dr Mandy Goldstein is a clinical psychologist with some 14 years’ experience in the treatment of eating disorders (EDs) and trauma. She is the Principal Clinical Psychologist at MGPsych, a private practice in Sydney, focusing on the treatment of EDs and those with trauma histories. Mandy has been involved in inpatient, outpatient and day program treatment settings for patients with EDs. She has undergone specialist training in the treatment of adults and adolescents with EDs, including FBT and CBTe; she works across the age and diagnostic ranges and teaches from an evidence-informed, core principles approach to treatment. Mandy’s training in the treatment of trauma began with group treatment for Vietnam War Veterans in a hospital outpatient treatment setting, and has continued for more than a decade with patients experiencing both simple trauma often leading to PTSD, and more complex trauma histories stemming from early childhood neglect and abuse. Mandy has trained in EMDR, Cognitive Processing Therapy and Internal Family Systems Therapy and has a particular interest in the co-occurrence of trauma and EDs and the clinical challenge this frequently presents. She offers consultation and supervision to trainee psychologists in FBT, as well as the treatment of EDs and trauma more generally.
Mandy completed her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Macquarie University, where her research and training was focused on enhancing the treatment of EDs. Her research has been published in international peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences. She is a Conjoint Senior Lecturer at University of Western Sydney and is Secretary of the Australia and New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders.

Chris Thornton is the Founder and Clinical Director of The Redleaf Practice, a large multidisciplinary private practice in Sydney. Chris has worked with individuals and families with eating disorders for nearly 30 years. Chris has consulted to inpatient, day patient and outpatient treatment services at major centres of eating disorders in both Australia and New Zealand. He continues to supervise programs and clinicians throughout Australia. Chris is a past president of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders, sits on the Steering Committee of the National Eating Disorders Collaboration and is a member of the Eating Disorder Credential Governing Council. He was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award in the field of eating disorders by the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders in 2020. Chris has presented numerous workshops on the treatment of eating disorders, both nationally and internationally. He has presented workshops on Motivational Enhancement Therapy; Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Day Program Treatment, Non-Negotiables in Eating Disorders Treatment, Mirror Exposure for Body Image Treatment, Treatment of Shame in Complex Eating Disorders, as well as on the strengths and limitations of evidence-based treatments.

Victoria Chappel is a Clinical Psychologist at The Redleaf Practice and the Northern Beaches Child and Youth Mental Health Service (CYMHS).
Victoria has worked with multiple CYMHS teams to provide systemic care for diverse presentations including eating disorders, trauma, anxiety, depression, and high-risk behaviours. Victoria also has worked with the Blacktown Adult Mental Health Team focused on providing treatment for complex trauma and survivors of sexual assault and domestic and family violence. Victoria has a particular interest in the interaction between eating disorders and trauma and how the complexity of this comorbidity can impact treatment.

MORNING CONCURRENT WORKSHOP IV
9.30am – 12.30pm
Workshop on attachment theory and its impact on eating disorders by Steve Arthey
Chair:
Aimee Maxwell, InMind 4 Health
(Steve Arthey will be presenting this workshop virtually. Delegates can still register to be a part of the workshop in-person from Mantra Mooloolaba)
(1030am – 10.50am Morning Tea Break)

Workshop Overview: Bowlby’s attachment theory has been widely applied in child development and social work research and practice. However, it has been comparatively sparsely applied in psychotherapy, particularly adolescent and adult psychotherapy. Attachment theory has identified four primary attachment patterns that have their origins, and can be identified, in the first months of life: Secure, ambivalent, avoidant, and disorganised. These attachment patterns are considered to be adaptive to the environment in which the child lives. They have been shown to be relatively stable and enduring patterns of relating to both oneself and others, but they have also been shown to be changeable, both in response to persistent environmental change and through psychological treatment.

In this half-day workshop we will:

  1. Develop an understanding of attachment theory, which Bowlby conceptualised as a cradle-to-grave theory, that has a strong evolutionary component: Patterns of behaviour develop in early life in order to maximise the individual’s chances of survival to reproductive age;
  2. Examine each of the attachment patterns, including:
    A. The parent-child patterns of relating that lead to the development of each of the attachment patterns,
    B. How each of the attachment patterns influences the person’s perceptions of self, other and the world,
    C. How the attachment patterns that are associated with psychopathology are likely to present in therapy, with a particular focus on people with eating disorders, and;
  3. Consider how the attachment patterns are sub-cortically driven, adaptations to the early attachment environment and how this is likely to contribute to the concept of “resistance” as it manifests in psychotherapy.
    A. This will include a discussion of how therapeutic considerations vary depending on the age of the person in treatment

Presenter:
Dr Steve Arthey (Ph.D.) is a clinical psychologist working in private practice in Burleigh Heads, QLD, Australia. He provides individual therapy to adults and adolescents. For 11 years Steve was the senior clinical psychologist at Albert Road Clinic, a private psychiatric hospital in Melbourne. At Albert Road Clinic, Steve developed and conducted programs for eating disorders, personality disorders, PTSD, depression, OCD and self-harm. Steve has extensive training in Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) and has published numerous peer reviewed articles on the theory, application and effectiveness of ISTDP as well as having presented over 50 training workshops on ISTDP in Australia and internationally. For the last 11 years, Steve has provided an internationally accredited (by the International Experiential Dynamic Therapists Association) core training program in ISTDP in Australia. As a result of the restrictions arising from COVID-19, this training program moved online and now has international enrolments. Additionally, Steve also conducts an online advanced training program for therapists that have completed an accredited ISTDP Core Training program.

12.30pm – 1.30pm Lunch

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP I
1.30pm – 4.30pm
Research in the Real World by Phillipa Hay, Gabriella Heruc, Kate Mulgrew & Yvette Miller
Chair:
Belinda Chelius, Eating Disorders Queensland

(3.00pm – 3.20pm Afternoon Tea Break)

Working out what treatment works for whom – beyond RCTs by Phillipa Hay: Research consistently has found that including person preference in treatment is associated with better outcomes, supporting the wider application of personalised therapy tailored to the Individual. In this workshop Professor Hay will present an overview of the evidence base for treatment in eating disorders, limitations in the research, and related issues such a ‘therapist drift’. Qualitative and empirical research that informs an understanding of “what works for whom” and personalised treatment will be reviewed and applied to a series of cases in an interactive discussion.

Assessing diet, nutrition and food intake in clinical eating disorder research by Gabriella Heruc: Despite changes in food intake and eating behaviour being fundamental to eating disorder presentations, there remains a shortage of research examining diet, nutrition and food intake in eating disorders. This workshop presentation will outline data collection methods and considerations for the assessment of dietary intake, eating behaviour and nutrition-related markers and variables across different clinical settings. It will also explore the involvement of the dietitian in research and evaluation of their role in interdisciplinary treatment teams.

Emerging topics within body positive and social media research by Kate Mulgrew: This presentation will discuss research on recent social media trends (fitspiration, BoPo & related positive body image trends, beauty filers, ‘filter-free’ images) and the influence they can have on users. Kate will also discuss emerging positive body image constructs such as body compassion, body functionality, body neutrality, and body appreciation; and offers suggestions for how to use these constructs in a meaningful way.

Unfortunately, Yvette Miller is unable to present due to unforeseen circumstances.

Presenters:

Professor Phillipa Hay is an academic psychiatrist and leading mental health researcher. In 2015 she received the Lifetime Leadership Award from the ANZ Academy for Eating Disorders, and in 2020 she was awarded the RANZCP Senior Research Award. She has published >367 Scopus indexed scientific papers and regularly presents her work nationally and internationally. She has been a leading Investigator on all major randomised controlled trials of therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa in as well as others in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Similarly, she has led many Cochrane and other systematic reviews distilling the research evidence. Her research into “what works” in eating disorders has informed clinical practice and other national and international guidelines and the recent Medicare funding for care in eating disorders. A major trial of people with longstanding anorexia nervosa for example has been influential in alternative models of care and service being developed for them. The White Paper she led at Western Sydney University supported a National Forum in 2018 and a commitment by National Eating Disorders Collaboration (NEDC) to develop guidelines for care of people with high BMI where she is Chair of the Working Group. She has made other major contributions to guideline for clinical practice such as those of the RANZCP (Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 2014 Nov; 48(11): pp977-1008) and Therapeutic Guidelines publication. The latter is widely referred to and utilised by general practitioner and specialists throughout Australia (https://www.tg.org.au/).

Dr Gabriella Heruc is an Accredited Practising Dietitian with Honours in Psychology, a Master of Nutrition & Dietetics and a PhD in Medicine. She is an Adjunct Fellow at Western Sydney University and Co-Director of ENRG – the Eating Disorders and Nutrition Research Group. Her research interests and collaborations have spanned examining omega-3 in mental health, the metabolic effects of skipping breakfast, appetite and gastrointestinal function in starvation, glucose regulation in anorexia nervosa, eating disorder presentations in private practice and the role of the dietitian in eating disorder management. She also led the development and publication of the first ever treatment principles and clinical practice standards for dietitians and mental health professionals providing eating disorder treatment (Journal of Eating Disorders), which aims to increase capabilities among health professionals to improve outcomes for people with an eating disorder. She also has over 20 years clinical experience in mental health with more than 15 years focused on eating disorder treatment in public and private inpatient, day program and outpatient settings.

Dr Kate Mulgrew is a body image researcher and Deputy Head, Research (SHBS), at University of the Sunshine Coast. She also serves as an Associate Editor on the international journal Body Image. She is interested in how social media can both be harmful and helpful to users, and in particular, how positive body image interventions can help to buffer negative media effects.

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP II
1.30pm – 4.30pm
Schema therapy for eating disorders – for complex presentations that do not respond to CBT by Evelyn Smith
Chair:
David Langford, Eating Disorders Queensland
(Morning workshop contd..)
(3.00pm – 3.20pm Afternoon Tea Break)

AFTERNOON CONCURRENT WORKSHOP III
1.30pm – 4.30pm
Trauma treatment in eating disorders by Chris Thornton, Mandy Goldstein & Victoria Chappel
Chair:
Catherine Houlihan, Workshop Co-chair
(Morning workshop contd..)
(3.00pm – 3.20pm Afternoon Tea Break)

4.30pm Saturday Workshops Conclude